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NEWS

Justice Department to probe allegations of police misconduct in Baltimore

Cassidy Johnson, Baltimore Sun
ENTERTAINMENT

'Fox & Friends' mistreats Elijah Cummings on IRS emails story

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NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
Sharon Fenick first heard the figure of speech "rule of thumb" cited as a sexist pejorative during her freshman year at Harvard seven years ago.The phrase was invoked in a lecture as an example of domestic abuse permitted by British common law. The rule of thumb, according to the professor, was a law that allowed a man to beat his wife so long as the rod used was no thicker than his thumb. But over the centuries, the term had evolved into vernacular for an "approximate measure.""It sounded very believable to me," says the 24-year-old Fenick, now in her third year of law school at the University of Chicago.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 7, 1991
SAVANNAH, Ga. -- To see where the life of Clarence Thomas might have ended up, one must journey to where it began, out on the tidal flats of the Moon River just south of town, where marsh grasses bend gently to breezes that smell faintly of brine and mud.Here at a small community called Pinpoint, little has changed from June 1948 when the man President Bush has nominated for the Supreme Court was born. The shack of a crab house where his mother picked meat for a nickel a pound still stands by the murky water.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Rafael Alvarez and Marcia Myers and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1997
If television viewers were surprised to see rats scurrying through a Lexington Market food stand during Thursday night newscasts about a murder there, city health officials were not.Only a month ago, a city inspector cited Lexington Market for rodent and insect infestation -- "roach, spider, flies, mouse, rat" -- in public areas of the market, as well as in the basement, according to a Dec. 31 violation notice describing the problems.Inspectors have repeatedly documented such evidence, but it has never been severe enough to require any of the dozens of food businesses at the market to close, said Bernard J. Bochenek, head of the Health Department's food inspection division.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
The Baltimore Blast, along with five other former Major Indoor Soccer League teams, have reached an agreement to partner with teams from the Professional Arena Soccer League to create a new league that is expected to consist of 20-plus teams throughout North America. The Milwaukee Wave, St. Louis Ambush, Missouri Comets, Rochester Lancers and Syracuse Silver Knights will join the Blast in the new league. All six franchises had their contracts with the United Soccer Leagues, which runs the MISL, expire last month after the 2013-14 season concluded.
FEATURES
By Ann LoLordo, Linell Smith and Patricia Meisol and Ann LoLordo, Linell Smith and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2001
A year ago, Tracy Whitehead was planning how to leave her abusive relationship with Joseph Palczynski, a decision that triggered her abduction, the deaths of four bystanders and the terrorizing of her family. Yesterday she was contemplating how to spend the money she won after "shock jock" Howard Stern was moved by her horrifying story. Stern flew the Baltimore County woman to Las Vegas as the winner of a hard luck contest he advertised on radio. And on Sunday night, in a Stern-arranged bet, Whitehead won $100,000 in one hand at blackjack.
SPORTS
By Jerry Greene and Jerry Greene,Orlando Sentinel | October 20, 1991
Miami had just beaten New England on the road, 20-10, and Miami Dolphins tight end Greg Baty was relaxing in the afterglow of one his best days as a professional football player. For the moment, the fear didn't show in his eyes.He had caught four passes from Dan Marino for 89 yards. A good day's work. "I can't wait to go home and hug my wife," he said.That's when the haunted look returned to his face. He had thought of his wife, Kathleen, home and alone.Granted, she's in no more danger now than any other woman alone.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | July 4, 1992
Installing ductwork for heating and air conditioning is a bit like putting together a huge three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle.The basic rules of the game, however, are the same, whether you're retrofitting an older house, working with new construction, or adding heating and air conditioning to a new room, attic or basement.Basic Rule No. 1: Hot air rises, cold air falls.Ducts should be installed to take maximum advantage of natural air movement. For instance, for air conditioning to work properly, air returns, the large ducts that carry air back to the central unit, need to be installed high up on the wall of each upper floor, to capture warmer air and return it for cooling.
SPORTS
By Bill Plaschke and Bill Plaschke,Los Angeles Times | March 29, 1991
VERO BEACH, Fla. -- The dissolution of Fernandomania reached its somber conclusion yesterday when Los Angeles Dodgers officials decided they had seen their once-great pitcher struggle for the last time.In a tiny, windowless office here in Dodgertown, Fernando Valenzuela, at 30, was told that he no longer was a Dodger. Intending to give him his unconditional release, the Dodgers put him on waivers."They call me into the office and say, 'This is very hard for us,' " Valenzuela said. "I said, 'What is so hard?
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1995
The presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church will tell the nation's Episcopalians today that he never intended to shield from prosecution the church's former treasurer, who is accused of embezzling about $2.2 million.The statement by the Most Rev. Edmond L. Browning will respond to "an outpouring of outrage from the grass roots" over what some have seen as a suggestion that charges would not be filed against Ellen Cooke, a church spokesman said.In a detailed message to church leaders, released to the public May 1, Bishop Browning disclosed that Mrs. Cooke is accused of diverting funds of the financially hard-pressed denomination to her personal use over a period of five years.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2003
Local motocross phenom Travis Pastrana has built a multimillion-dollar career around gravity-defying stunts and impossible speeds. Now the 19-year-old faces thousands of dollars in reckless driving fines and, he said, deep regret for his role in a crash last month that left a friend unable to walk. Standing in a large motorbike garage on his property in Davidsonville yesterday, Pastrana said that he is reluctant to get behind the wheel of another car -- at least outside the racetrack.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com | March 7, 2010
Nick Markakis' expression and demeanor never changed amid some of the most challenging moments of his young career. But he acknowledged that the weight of being a first-time husband and father, starting a charitable foundation, making Maryland his family's year-round home and trying to justify the six-year, $66.1 million contract he signed with the Orioles last January took its toll. So did the Orioles' continued losing and his own on-field struggles that left the normally unflappable outfielder questioning himself at times last season.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
Kristina Suson's home wasn't part of the city's tax sale Monday, but it was a close call. Baltimore places liens on properties for unpaid property taxes, water bills and other municipal debts, then puts the liens up for auction every spring — allowing investors to buy them and either collect or move to foreclose. The city auctioned liens on about 10,600 properties on Monday, finding buyers for 6,545 of them and raising $20 million. Suson ended up on this year's list, to her surprise, after the state retroactively reduced a property tax credit she'd received in 2009.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 21, 1992
To eat the crab mustard, or not to eat the crab mustard, that was the question.Recently I struggled with this uncertainty. I pondered which parts of the crab I wanted to eat, and which parts I didn't.I didn't think about it too long. A half-dozen soft crabs, soon to be known as supper, were sitting on the kitchen counter. It was my job to clean them, to prepare them for cooking by snipping off unwanted parts.I removed the underside of the crab called its apron. I opened it up and removed the gills or "devil's fingers."
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | January 18, 1994
Maryland's commuter train system is getting a major revamping with a timetable that adds midday and rush hour service, a new stop at Laurel Race Course and a cafe-parlor car that will offer food, drinks and first-class seats.The revised schedule unveiled yesterday by Mass Transit Administration goes into effect Jan. 31. State officials said the changes should make train service more convenient and reliable than in the past."What we're trying to do is enhance our service and create a more flexible schedule," said Maryland Transportation Secretary O. James Lighthizer.
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