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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

SPORTS

Earl Badu, former Maryland basketball player, jumps to his death onto I-695

NEWS

FBI files show details of background checks on author Tom Clancy

Rodger Mallison / Baltimore Sun
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF Bloomberg News contributed to this article | May 7, 1997
Fila Holding SpA shares fell by more than 13 percent yesterday after the Italian sportswear company reported first-quarter earnings that rose a lower-than-expected 14 percent in dollar terms.Fila, which has its U.S. headquarters in Sparks, reported a first-quarter profit of $32.6 million, or $1.22 per American depositary share, from $28.5 million, or $1.08 per share, for the same period a year ago. In lira terms, the quarter's net profit rose 19 percent to 53.39 billion lire. Analysts had predicted earnings would be between $1.22 and $1.30.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1997
BOYNTON BEACH, Fla. -- In America, no matter how many times you fail, no matter how many times you are thrown into the muck in disgrace, you can always try again to get rich. And Jeffrey A. Levitt is a living testimonial to that.In the '70s, as a notorious Baltimore slumlord, he was convicted of housing violations over 500 times and sparked so much wrath that a tenant once fired a 12-gauge shotgun blast through his window and sent shards of glass into his buttocks.In the '80s, as a garishly wealthy, overweight swindler, he sent his financial empire crashing to the ground in a scandal that landed him in prison for stealing $14.6 million from his own thrift, Old Court Savings and Loan.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
Sharon Fenick first heard the figure of speech "rule of thumb" cited as a sexist pejorative during her freshman year at Harvard seven years ago.The phrase was invoked in a lecture as an example of domestic abuse permitted by British common law. The rule of thumb, according to the professor, was a law that allowed a man to beat his wife so long as the rod used was no thicker than his thumb. But over the centuries, the term had evolved into vernacular for an "approximate measure.""It sounded very believable to me," says the 24-year-old Fenick, now in her third year of law school at the University of Chicago.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2010
Forty-seven years had passed since the last star had been added to the American flag, before two new designs were flown for the first time over Fort McHenry within months in 1959. Arizona became the 48th star in 1912, and the new flags adding Alaska and Hawaii each made their debut in Baltimore — both on the Fourth of July. An executive order signed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower on Jan. 3, 1959, after the admittance of Alaska to the Union, reconfigured the stars on the old 48-star flag to seven rows of seven stars each, staggered horizontally and vertically.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1999
Of all the men and women who graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy yesterday, the one who received the loudest and most sustained cheers was the one who finished last.Manuel J. "Manny" Metcalf was the Class of 1999's "anchor" -- the 868th ranked midshipman of 868.At the academy, coming in last is no reason to hang your head.The thinking is: if Annapolis-trained officers are among the best and brightest of the nation's collegians, emerging at the end of four arduous years as the worst of the best of the best ain't bad.According to one of the many obscure traditions at this 152-year-old school, there is a serious financial perk to graduating at the bottom.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
We would have remembered him if it was just the songwriting or just the dancing or just the eyebrow-raising fashion. But Michael Jackson dominated each of those artistic avenues - and so many others. You see his influence in every Justin Timberlake who sweats to perfect a signature move. Every movie-esque flourish in a video. Every African-American artist who sits atop the pop charts. His legacy is as enduring as it is multi-faceted. 1. Sound When America first met Jackson, he was a lovable, pint-sized pre-teen with a puffy Afro and an electric voice.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | March 25, 1992
DARLINGTON -- In three years, Jerry M. Scarborough has gone from the top gun in the state police to odd man out.The Harford County resident was named the state police Trooper of the Year in 1989 for the dozens of drunken-driving arrests he made.Now, he is fighting for his job, feuding with neighbors and facing six months' probation for poisoning three dogs that lived on his street.Mr. Scarborough was sentenced March 11 to supervised probation and ordered to pay $321 restitution to the owners of the three poisoned dogs.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | July 4, 1992
Installing ductwork for heating and air conditioning is a bit like putting together a huge three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle.The basic rules of the game, however, are the same, whether you're retrofitting an older house, working with new construction, or adding heating and air conditioning to a new room, attic or basement.Basic Rule No. 1: Hot air rises, cold air falls.Ducts should be installed to take maximum advantage of natural air movement. For instance, for air conditioning to work properly, air returns, the large ducts that carry air back to the central unit, need to be installed high up on the wall of each upper floor, to capture warmer air and return it for cooling.
FEATURES
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | June 27, 1994
Ocean City -- He's just a little man with a boombox next to his ear. But everybody knows him, and his passage down the Boardwalk is slowed by fans."It's Boardwalk Elvis!" one woman tells another. "Hi, Elvis!""Hey, it's Elvis!" says a young man to his friends. "Let's get our picture taken with him. Come on, Elvis, pose with us!"And he does, stopping and standing very still as the young men zTC surround him, draping arms around his narrow shoulders and mugging for the camera.Norman Webb, 55, has been Boardwalk Elvis for as long as anyone can remember, making his way up and down the boards with his boombox, singing along with an Elvis tape.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | June 21, 2000
IN HIS NEW BOOK, "Kitchen Confidential," Anthony Bourdain, a 43-year-old bad-boy chef from New York, says some nasty things about the way restaurant kitchens work. He says the fish sold on Monday probably was delivered on Saturday. He says that if you order a steak "well-done," you're likely to get a tough, stringy piece of sirloin. And he says no matter what the menu claims about the chef's love of low-fat cooking, butter - at least a quarter stick per customer - is the backbone of the restaurant business.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2004
IT'S FUNNY how some people - myself included - can drive around for years, wondering why Howard County street signs are color-coded without trying to find the answer. Karen Gilbert isn't one of them. "The street signs in the Columbia area are different colors - some green, some brown, some blue," Gilbert said. "At the corner of Eden Brook and Guilford Road, the Guilford Road sign is green on one side of the street and blue on the other. What is the significance of the different colors?"
NEWS
By Dmitri Krushnic | January 29, 1998
SHORTLY before Monica Lewinsky began her White House internship in 1995, I completed a four-month-long internship there. Since news broke last week about allegations of a sexual affair between Ms. Lewinsky and President Clinton, I've intently followed the story, and reflected on my White House memories.At least one element of the unfolding story seems misleading. In attempting to find clues about Ms. Lewinsky's behavior to determine whether they suggest an affair, the media have reported that sources describe Ms. Lewinsky as ''infatuated'' with the president, ''star struck'' and even ''a stalker.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
SCHENECTADY, N.Y. -- Forget Beverly Hills 90210. The cool ZIP code for kids is North Pole 12345.Actually, the 12345 ZIP is exclusively assigned to a sprawling General Electric plant in Schenectady. But come December, the GE mailroom brims with letters addressed to Candy Lane or Iceberg Drive or Chillyville, North Pole. They all carry urgent messages for Santa Claus, and they all carry that child-friendly ZIP code."Whatever it is, they seem to write 12345," said Linda Susi, one of more than a dozen GE employees who sat down yesterday to spend a long lunch helping harried ol' St. Nick keep up with his correspondence.
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