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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

ENTERTAINMENT

Meteorologist Bernadette Woods says she is leaving WJZ-TV

Photo courtesy of WJZ/CBS
NEWS

No sentence reduction for Browning, who killed family in '08

Matt Roth / Patuxent Publishing
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2004
Two anchors from WBAL-TV are leaving their jobs, part of a series of unrelated shifts at the top-rated Baltimore news station. Morning news anchor Marilyn Getas will be replaced by Mindy Basara, a reporter and weekend morning anchor who has been with WBAL-TV since 1998. Absent the opportunity to move into a more prominent anchor slot here, Getas said she would have preferred to stay in her current job. But she could not come to terms with the station on a new contract. Her final day is June 4, and she is pursuing other television news jobs.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writers | August 3, 1994
It was a painful moment for a man of his calling."I was in shock," the Rev. A. Joseph Maskell declared. "I never had sex with a kid."That was in May, and Father Maskell, pastor of St. Augustine's Roman Catholic Church in Elkridge, was describing his reaction to the first in a series of allegations that he had sexually abused students while he was a chaplain and counselor at Archbishop Keough High School more than two decades ago."It is absolutely untrue," he repeated over and over again in an interview with The Sun in his sparsely furnished rectory office.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 6, 2006
Dr. Christian Frederick Richter, a retired Baltimore County obstetrician and gynecologist who was an avid Civil War buff, died of leukemia Thursday at Edenwald Retirement Community in Towson. The former longtime Ruxton resident was 91. Dr. Richter, the son of a builder, was born in Baltimore and raised in Overlea. He was a 1932 graduate of Towson High School and earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland in 1936. After earning his medical degree from the University of Maryland Medical School in 1941, Dr. Richter worked for the U.S. Public Health Service in New Orleans during World War II. He returned to Baltimore after the war and established an OB/GYN practice in Towson.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1997
Staring into a video camera in the fall of 1995, 23-year-old Kimberly Spicer didn't know it but she didn't have much longer to live."What are you doing, Kim?" asked her sister, who was shooting a home video of the family's visit to their stepfather before his open-heart surgery at Harbor Hospital Center."I'm looking out the harbor window, wishing I was on the boat," said the pretty auburn-haired woman, then unemployed, struggling with a crack cocaine problem and drifting through life in lower-middle-class South Baltimore.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writers | June 19, 1994
An article in The Sun June 19 about the unsolved murder of Sister Catherine Ann Cesnik reported that during the investigation of her disappearance on Nov. 7, 1969, Inspector Julian I. Forrest Sr., chief of detectives, had pressured investigators on behalf of the Archdiocese of Baltimore.In fact, Mr. Forrest had retired in October 1966.Col. Edwin E. Taylor, who was chief of the criminal investigation division when Sister Catherine disappeared, retired Dec. 25, 1969, just before her body was found Jan. 3, 1970, in Lansdowne.
NEWS
By Craig Marine | March 17, 1995
San Francisco -- TUPAC SHAKUR is a punk. Worse than that, he's a punk masquerading as a role model.In the April issue of Vibe magazine, the rapper-turned-actor-turned-shooter speaks from jail on Rikers Island and does his best to spread enough manure to fertilize the Nebraska cornfields.Tupac Shakur, 23, who was sentenced to 4 1/2 years in prison last month on a sex-abuse charge, would have us believe that he's been freed from his "addiction" to pot-smoking, club-hopping and his "Thug Life" persona.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1996
Before gangsta raps there were raps about libraries and teen-age pregnancy; before Dannemora State Prison and the killing bullets, there were pillow fights and the exuberance of youth.Tupac Amaru Shakur did not grow up in Baltimore. He was not a finished product when he left. But his years here encompassed that crucial time when childhood ends and self-discovery begins.He was 14 when he and his mother moved here from the Bronx in 1985. He called himself MC New York and won a rap contest sponsored by the Enoch Pratt Free Library.
SPORTS
By Dan Shaughnessy and Dan Shaughnessy,Boston Globe | February 16, 1993
Boston's winter of 1948 was bitterly cold. Slugger Ted Williams went south to fish. On Jan. 28, while Ted was fishing in Florida, Doris Williams gave birth to a daughter, Barbara Joyce Williams. The baby was early. Ted was late.The Globe's Harold Kaese wrote, "Everyone knows where Moses was when the lights went out. And apparently everybody knows where Ted Williams was when his baby was born Tuesday. He was fishing."In his biography, "My Turn at Bat," Williams wrote, "Well, Bobby Jo was the most important thing in my life from the moment she was born . . . but I sure wasn't going to apologize for something that didn't concern anybody but Doris and me."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In the pre-dawn darkness of Oct. 14, 1996, the USS Theodore Roosevelt was maneuvering in the choppy Atlantic waters 100 miles off Cape Hatteras, N.C. The carrier was "backing down" -- reversing -- when it collided with a cruiser, the USS Leyte Gulf, in a thunderous screech of steel that knocked sailors to the decks and caused $10 million in damage.In the Navy, the reverberations of that October night are still being felt.The commander of the carrier, Rear Adm. Ronald L. Christenson, a 1969 Naval Academy graduate, was later judged to be the most culpable for the collision and received a punitive letter of reprimand in November 1996, usually a career-ender.
SPORTS
By Shia Kapos and Michael Hirsley and Shia Kapos and Michael Hirsley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2002
CHICAGO - St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Darryl Kile complained of shoulder pain and weakness the night before he died, possible warning signs that he had heart problems, officials said yesterday. An autopsy on Kile, 33, revealed an 80 to 90 percent narrowing of two of his three coronary arteries, and that his heart was nearly 25 percent larger than normal, said Dr. Edmund Donoghue, the Cook County, Ill., medical examiner. Donoghue said he believed Kile's condition, known as coronary atheroscleroris or hardening of the arteries, brought on an erratic heartbeat that caused his death.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | October 5, 1993
Tonya Lucas was sentenced yesterday to the maximum penalty of six consecutive life terms in prison for setting the fire that killed six of her children -- a crime described by the judge and the prosecutor as one of the worst in Baltimore's history."
NEWS
By David Simon Roger Twigg, Rafael Alvarez, Ginger Thompson and Ann LoLordo of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | December 5, 1990
A shooting ambush at a Prince George's County shopping center yesterday claimed the life of James "Jay" Stanley Bias III, the younger brother of University of Maryland basketball star Len Bias, whose death of a cocaine overdose four years ago shocked the nation.Twenty-year-old James Bias, who until last year played basketball at Allegany Community College in Cumberland, was leaving the Prince George's Plaza with two friends in a four-wheel-drive Toyota truck at 1:10 p.m. when they were attacked by a gunman who fired at least five shots into the vehicle, police said.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1990
WHAT DOES it mean when you hear that a dear friend has had a heart attack and is in the hospital in critical condition? Just how bad is critical? You might call the hospital the next day and be told his condition is stable. Does that mean he is out of danger now?Perhaps you read about an accident on I-95 in which three local teen-agers are hurt. The paper says one of the passengers was hospitalized in critical condition. The next day you read that the teen's condition is guarded. Does that mean he is getting better or worse?
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