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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS

Leader of Dead Man Inc. gang renounces group at sentencing

SPORTS

Putting the Maryland coaches' salaries in perspective

Kim Hairston, Baltimore Sun
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
We would have remembered him if it was just the songwriting or just the dancing or just the eyebrow-raising fashion. But Michael Jackson dominated each of those artistic avenues - and so many others. You see his influence in every Justin Timberlake who sweats to perfect a signature move. Every movie-esque flourish in a video. Every African-American artist who sits atop the pop charts. His legacy is as enduring as it is multi-faceted. 1. Sound When America first met Jackson, he was a lovable, pint-sized pre-teen with a puffy Afro and an electric voice.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writers | August 3, 1994
It was a painful moment for a man of his calling."I was in shock," the Rev. A. Joseph Maskell declared. "I never had sex with a kid."That was in May, and Father Maskell, pastor of St. Augustine's Roman Catholic Church in Elkridge, was describing his reaction to the first in a series of allegations that he had sexually abused students while he was a chaplain and counselor at Archbishop Keough High School more than two decades ago."It is absolutely untrue," he repeated over and over again in an interview with The Sun in his sparsely furnished rectory office.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writers | June 19, 1994
An article in The Sun June 19 about the unsolved murder of Sister Catherine Ann Cesnik reported that during the investigation of her disappearance on Nov. 7, 1969, Inspector Julian I. Forrest Sr., chief of detectives, had pressured investigators on behalf of the Archdiocese of Baltimore.In fact, Mr. Forrest had retired in October 1966.Col. Edwin E. Taylor, who was chief of the criminal investigation division when Sister Catherine disappeared, retired Dec. 25, 1969, just before her body was found Jan. 3, 1970, in Lansdowne.
NEWS
By Robert S. McElvaine | August 31, 1997
IT IS GENERALLY accepted that the Civil War was the most important event in American history. Yet, as two recent controversies remind us, we disagree on what that war was about.The question of whether the nation should make a formal apology for slavery has brought forth from such authorities as former history professor Newt Gingrich and columnist George F. Will the declaration that we fought the war to end slavery.Meanwhile, across the South, where battles continue over the display of Confederate flags and related symbols, white defenders of their "heritage" argue that the Civil War was not about slavery but about states' rights and "Southern independence."
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 25, 2010
When patients are in the throes of a heart attack, there's no question that stents save lives. But for heart patients with few symptoms and less than severe artery blockage, whether to use a stent is a question with no clear-cut answer, say cardiologists. In fact, these days some heart experts say the mesh metal tubes used to keep narrowed or weakened arteries propped open are overused for blockages that can be treated just as well with medicine, a healthy diet and exercise. A recent internal review of heart patients at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson found 369 patients received the coronary implants unnecessarily.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | September 29, 2002
Why does the water heater in my new house have another small tank hanging off the side of the pipe above it? That is an expansion tank installed on the water supply pipe to the water heater. Its purpose is to deal with thermal expansion of water as it heats up in the water heater - to prevent water pressure from getting too high. If water pressure gets high enough it can damage valves in plumbing fixtures, joints in supply pipes and even the water heater. Thermal expansion always occurs in water heaters.
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | February 27, 2008
My oven has convection-roast and convection-bake settings. I understand convection is a heat-circulating fan, but the roast vs. baking part confuses me. What difference does it make to the oven if I leave the lid off a meat pan? In food language, roast and bake really aren't different. Both are done in an open pan, usually in an oven. We refer to cooking meats and vegetables in an open pan as roasting, while cakes, cookies and pies are baked. But convection, which uses fans to circulate air, is a different beast.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1996
I have a 6-year-old son in good health who has an interesting problem.For the last year or so, one of his outer ears sometimes becomes very hot to the touch and bright red. This can happen when he is resting, bouncing around or even eating. It doesn't seem to have any pattern, except that it is only one ear at a time. He doesn't have a cold or an ear infection when this happens.Someone said it is blood pressure, so I am concerned. I have asked doctors in the past who brush it off. Please let me know what you think.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2012
All politics is local. All candidates for Congress are not. At least eight candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives from Maryland — including four prominent contenders — are running this year in congressional districts that do not encompass their own homes, a review of property records and recent candidate filings shows. Some live close enough to stroll into the district they are vying to represent. Others are more than an hour's drive away. Federal candidates are not required to live where they run for office.
HEALTH
By Robin Rudner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Robin Rudner weighs in on goal-setting. Jan. 1 has come and gone. If you made a resolution to improve your health and fitness (and you're serious this time), have you evaluated your progress? Do you have a plan? Consider SMART goal setting, an approach often used in corporate training.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
Sharon Fenick first heard the figure of speech "rule of thumb" cited as a sexist pejorative during her freshman year at Harvard seven years ago.The phrase was invoked in a lecture as an example of domestic abuse permitted by British common law. The rule of thumb, according to the professor, was a law that allowed a man to beat his wife so long as the rod used was no thicker than his thumb. But over the centuries, the term had evolved into vernacular for an "approximate measure.""It sounded very believable to me," says the 24-year-old Fenick, now in her third year of law school at the University of Chicago.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 19, 2010
A half-century after his untimely death at the age of 38, celebrated tenor and movie star Mario Lanza is receiving fresh medical attention from a Baltimore doctor who takes a dim view of one of the singer's weight-loss treatments - injections of the urine of pregnant women, a controversial therapy with new followers today. Dr. Philip A. Mackowiak, vice chairman of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and director of the Medical Care Clinical Center at the Veterans Administration Hospital downtown, teamed up with Armando Cesari, Lanza's Australia-based biographer, for an article about the singer's health issues just out in The Pharos, the journal of the medical honorary society Alpha Omega Alpha.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | April 28, 1993
A 53-year-old northeast Carroll county man was sentenced yesterday to eight years in state prison for sexually abusing three neighborhood children over four years.Carroll Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. sentenced the defendant to 15 years for child abuse and eight years each for two counts of battery. The man's name is being withheld to protect the children's privacy.His victims were two boys and a girl, court records show.Judge Beck suspended all but eight years of the sentence and ordered the defendant to serve five years of supervised probation after his release from prison.
FEATURES
By Paige Williams and Paige Williams,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 1, 1998
This article is based on Montana and North Carolina court records, hearing transcripts, interviews, newspaper archives, and Charles Kuralt's books "A Life on the Road," "On the Road With Charles Kuralt" and "Charles Kuralt's America."On his sickbed in New York in the summer of 1997, Charles Kuralt thought of Montana, a place he had loved for a great many years for its natural wonders, far away from his life in the city.Down by a riverside, he built a log cabin. It reminded him of his native North Carolina, but most of all it gave him a place to disappear.
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