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HEALTH
By Robin Rudner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Robin Rudner weighs in on goal-setting. Jan. 1 has come and gone. If you made a resolution to improve your health and fitness (and you're serious this time), have you evaluated your progress? Do you have a plan? Consider SMART goal setting, an approach often used in corporate training.
NEWS
By Robert S. McElvaine | August 31, 1997
IT IS GENERALLY accepted that the Civil War was the most important event in American history. Yet, as two recent controversies remind us, we disagree on what that war was about.The question of whether the nation should make a formal apology for slavery has brought forth from such authorities as former history professor Newt Gingrich and columnist George F. Will the declaration that we fought the war to end slavery.Meanwhile, across the South, where battles continue over the display of Confederate flags and related symbols, white defenders of their "heritage" argue that the Civil War was not about slavery but about states' rights and "Southern independence."
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,sun reporter | March 21, 2007
Six decades ago, in a hamlet in rural northern Minnesota, a preteen boy felt lost. His parents were "the town drunks" of Thief River Falls, says Gary Paulsen, leaving him without direction, ambition or self-esteem. He says he was on the road to becoming "one messed-up juvenile delinquent -- no doubt about it." Then the town librarian took an interest in him and introduced him to the world of books. "Reading," he says, "saved my life." That rescue-by-book may give Paulsen, a beloved author of young adult fiction, something in common with a boy who made headlines around the world yesterday.
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | February 27, 2008
My oven has convection-roast and convection-bake settings. I understand convection is a heat-circulating fan, but the roast vs. baking part confuses me. What difference does it make to the oven if I leave the lid off a meat pan? In food language, roast and bake really aren't different. Both are done in an open pan, usually in an oven. We refer to cooking meats and vegetables in an open pan as roasting, while cakes, cookies and pies are baked. But convection, which uses fans to circulate air, is a different beast.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | December 22, 2013
A recent New York Times illustration read, "COLLEGE IS FOR SUCKERS. " The words were emblazoned across the sweatshirts of four students, and the accompanying article made essentially that point. It echoed an increasingly common refrain that college is expensive, that students are taking on unmanageable debt and that they too often graduate unprepared for the world of work. In contrast, many economists and educators point to data showing that the fastest growing job categories require at least a college degree.
FEATURES
By Paige Williams and Paige Williams,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 1, 1998
This article is based on Montana and North Carolina court records, hearing transcripts, interviews, newspaper archives, and Charles Kuralt's books "A Life on the Road," "On the Road With Charles Kuralt" and "Charles Kuralt's America."On his sickbed in New York in the summer of 1997, Charles Kuralt thought of Montana, a place he had loved for a great many years for its natural wonders, far away from his life in the city.Down by a riverside, he built a log cabin. It reminded him of his native North Carolina, but most of all it gave him a place to disappear.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
We would have remembered him if it was just the songwriting or just the dancing or just the eyebrow-raising fashion. But Michael Jackson dominated each of those artistic avenues - and so many others. You see his influence in every Justin Timberlake who sweats to perfect a signature move. Every movie-esque flourish in a video. Every African-American artist who sits atop the pop charts. His legacy is as enduring as it is multi-faceted. 1. Sound When America first met Jackson, he was a lovable, pint-sized pre-teen with a puffy Afro and an electric voice.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Joel Obermayer and Peter Hermann and Joel Obermayer,Sun Staff Writers | November 17, 1994
An East Baltimore man was charged this morning with decapitating a fortune teller who was the matriarch of a powerful Gypsy family in Baltimore and whose advice he had sought in the past.Douglas Thomas Clark, 28, of the 2200 block of E. Lombard St., was charged with first-degree murder in connection with yesterday's slaying of Deborah Stevens, which jolted a clan that traces its Baltimore heritage to the turn of the century.Officer Robert W. Weinhold Jr., a police spokesman, said investigators had not recovered a weapon and knew of no motive.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | September 29, 2002
Why does the water heater in my new house have another small tank hanging off the side of the pipe above it? That is an expansion tank installed on the water supply pipe to the water heater. Its purpose is to deal with thermal expansion of water as it heats up in the water heater - to prevent water pressure from getting too high. If water pressure gets high enough it can damage valves in plumbing fixtures, joints in supply pipes and even the water heater. Thermal expansion always occurs in water heaters.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 28, 1997
NEW ORLEANS -- They came in swarms in their Jeep Wranglers and sports cars to the funeral home, so unschooled in the conventions of death that many did not know how to dress. Louisiana State University offers few occasions that require a navy suit.Many in the crowd may never have been to a wake. Certainly, few had ever buried a friend.Benjamin Wynne, 20, whose wake and funeral were held here yesterday, died Monday night after drinking enough to put him six times over Louisiana's legal limit for intoxication.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | December 2, 1994
I realize that we no longer live in an age of heroes.I realize that we must expect everyone, no matter how important they become, to let us down at one time or another.Nevertheless, today I feel a special sense of loss. I feel that my trust has been betrayed.Paula Jones has told a fib.Paula Jones is the person suing President Clinton for $700,000 because, she says, he dropped his pants and asked for sex in a Little Rock hotel room when he was governor of Arkansas.But ever since she made her accusations, Jones' own character has been under assault.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
Sharon Fenick first heard the figure of speech "rule of thumb" cited as a sexist pejorative during her freshman year at Harvard seven years ago.The phrase was invoked in a lecture as an example of domestic abuse permitted by British common law. The rule of thumb, according to the professor, was a law that allowed a man to beat his wife so long as the rod used was no thicker than his thumb. But over the centuries, the term had evolved into vernacular for an "approximate measure.""It sounded very believable to me," says the 24-year-old Fenick, now in her third year of law school at the University of Chicago.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | March 14, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- Talk about flocks of would-be stars.The filming of "The Dark Half," based on Stephen King's novel, required some 4,500 birds, possibly the biggest bird casting call since Alfred Hitchcock's "The Birds" (1963).Directed and scripted by scare-meister George A. Romero, the Orion Pictures film stars Timothy Hutton as an author with a murderous subconscious. When it comes to the surface, so do the birds, who symbolize the writer's dark side.One dramatic sequence has some 1,200 taking flight.
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