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NEWS

No justice for Gina [Commentary]

Wm. G. Hotz Sr., Baltimore Sun file photo
ENTERTAINMENT

Robert F. Chew, who played Proposition Joe on 'The Wire,' dead at 52

Barbara Haddock Taylor/Baltimore Sun
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writers | August 3, 1994
It was a painful moment for a man of his calling."I was in shock," the Rev. A. Joseph Maskell declared. "I never had sex with a kid."That was in May, and Father Maskell, pastor of St. Augustine's Roman Catholic Church in Elkridge, was describing his reaction to the first in a series of allegations that he had sexually abused students while he was a chaplain and counselor at Archbishop Keough High School more than two decades ago."It is absolutely untrue," he repeated over and over again in an interview with The Sun in his sparsely furnished rectory office.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1996
Richard Nicolas' daughter was 2 years old, but they had never spent even a minute alone together. A Friday night outing at Golden Ring Mall would be the first time. He would take Aja to an 8 o'clock movie, "The Adventures of Pinocchio," and return her to her mother. At the last minute, when her mother wavered about letting her go, Aja was insistent."Want to see Pinocchio!" the toddler said. "Want to see Pinocchio!"They saw the movie, but that night, July 26, would be father and daughter's last together.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writers | June 19, 1994
An article in The Sun June 19 about the unsolved murder of Sister Catherine Ann Cesnik reported that during the investigation of her disappearance on Nov. 7, 1969, Inspector Julian I. Forrest Sr., chief of detectives, had pressured investigators on behalf of the Archdiocese of Baltimore.In fact, Mr. Forrest had retired in October 1966.Col. Edwin E. Taylor, who was chief of the criminal investigation division when Sister Catherine disappeared, retired Dec. 25, 1969, just before her body was found Jan. 3, 1970, in Lansdowne.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 6, 2006
Dr. Christian Frederick Richter, a retired Baltimore County obstetrician and gynecologist who was an avid Civil War buff, died of leukemia Thursday at Edenwald Retirement Community in Towson. The former longtime Ruxton resident was 91. Dr. Richter, the son of a builder, was born in Baltimore and raised in Overlea. He was a 1932 graduate of Towson High School and earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland in 1936. After earning his medical degree from the University of Maryland Medical School in 1941, Dr. Richter worked for the U.S. Public Health Service in New Orleans during World War II. He returned to Baltimore after the war and established an OB/GYN practice in Towson.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writers | August 10, 1994
Baltimore City detectives investigating sex abuse allegations against a Roman Catholic priest dug up a van load of confidential records yesterday the priest had ordered buried four years ago in Brooklyn's Holy Cross Cemetery.City police were accompanied by the two Baltimore County homicide detectives assigned to the revived investigation of the unsolved 1969 slaying of Sister Catherine Ann Cesnik.A high-ranking county police official said investigators were there because the name of the priest -- the Rev. A. Joseph Maskell -- had come up during their probe of the 25-year-old crime.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1996
The father of a Baltimore toddler found dead in the front seat of a car in a remote area of a Northeast Baltimore industrial park Friday night has been charged with killing her in a crime a police spokesman decribed yesterday as "evil."Richard A. Nicolas, 31, of the 500 block of Orkney Road was charged yesterdaymorning with first-degree murder and use of a handgun in commission of a felony in the death of 2-year-old Aja Nicolas, said Agent Robert W. Weinhold Jr., a police spokesman."When you think of a child's innocence and how that child trusts a parent, it's beyond human comprehension how someone could commit such an evil act," Weinhold said.
NEWS
July 14, 1999
Prosecutor's office is open and effective and respects the lawAs the state's attorney for Baltimore, I have been and continue to be accessible and accountable. I attend community meetings, return telephone calls and respond to media and citizen inquiries. I am an honest, hardworking public servant who represents the citizens of Baltimore in a competent and responsible fashion.The Sun has interviewed me numerous times. I am the only individual in city government who has opened up her office and life to a Sun reporter.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
We would have remembered him if it was just the songwriting or just the dancing or just the eyebrow-raising fashion. But Michael Jackson dominated each of those artistic avenues - and so many others. You see his influence in every Justin Timberlake who sweats to perfect a signature move. Every movie-esque flourish in a video. Every African-American artist who sits atop the pop charts. His legacy is as enduring as it is multi-faceted. 1. Sound When America first met Jackson, he was a lovable, pint-sized pre-teen with a puffy Afro and an electric voice.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writers | July 1, 1994
Baltimore County detectives and FBI agents met this week to consider possible connections between the unsolved slayings of Sister Catherine Ann Cesnik and Joyce Helen Malecki, who vanished four days apart in 1969.Maj. Allan J. Webster, chief of the county's Criminal Investigation Services Division, said yesterday the agencies will meet again to compare information.Capt. Rustin Price, head of the county homicide squad, said, "We don't want to raise any false hopes, but we are checking out everything we can."
NEWS
By Robert S. McElvaine | August 31, 1997
IT IS GENERALLY accepted that the Civil War was the most important event in American history. Yet, as two recent controversies remind us, we disagree on what that war was about.The question of whether the nation should make a formal apology for slavery has brought forth from such authorities as former history professor Newt Gingrich and columnist George F. Will the declaration that we fought the war to end slavery.Meanwhile, across the South, where battles continue over the display of Confederate flags and related symbols, white defenders of their "heritage" argue that the Civil War was not about slavery but about states' rights and "Southern independence."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2000
CUMBERLAND -- John A. Miller IV, described by prosecutors as a "highly motivated predator" who lured a Carroll County girl to her death, was convicted yesterday of murder and sexual assault, setting the stage for a death penalty hearing next week. Miller, 27, was found guilty of first-degree murder, a first-degree sexual offense, robbery and false imprisonment in the strangling of 17-year-old Shen D. Poehlman in Reisterstown in July 1998. The defense had conceded that Miller killed the girl but had fought the sexual-assault and robbery allegations, knowing that prosecutors needed those convictions to pursue the death penalty.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche and Walter F. Roche,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2004
A Catonsville dentist and his hygienist wife pleaded guilty yesterday to cocaine possession but avoided convictions or jail terms, as District Judge Dorothy J. Wilson -- over the objections of the prosecutor -- granted them probation before judgment. The dentist, Charles P. Franz, 41, will be under supervised probation for 18 months and must undergo drug tests. His dental license was suspended earlier, but he is fighting to get the right to resume his practice. A hearing is scheduled Wednesday before the state dental board on charges issued Feb. 18 that Franz violated the state law regulating dentists by possessing or using drugs in an illegitimate manner.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writers | December 16, 1994
The Sun reported incorrectly on Friday that two plaintiffs in a sexual abuse lawsuit against the Rev. A. Joseph Maskell had recovered memories of alleged abuse under therapy.According to their lawyer, Beverly A. Wallace, neither plaintiff recovered any memory concerning Father Maskell or the allegations in the complaint as a result of therapy.The Sun regrets the error.The Rev. A. Joseph Maskell, who left his Elkridge parish July 31 to seek psychological treatment in the wake of allegations that he sexually abused high school students, has officially resigned from the post.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
Joseph T. Maskell, a retired Baltimore police lieutenant who was shot in a 1964 robbery that began the notorious Veney brothers case, died of lung cancer April 10 at his Mount Washington home. He was 73.Lieutenant Maskell joined the Police Department in 1946 and, after recovering from his wounds, retired in 1966. He became an adjuster for an insurance company and was appointed vice president of marketing at Freestate Adjusting Co. in 1979. He retired again in 1986 and was a rental car salesman until 1990.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporter | January 27, 2008
After sitting through two painful trials for the man accused of shooting his daughter in the head and killing her, Joe Nueslein was relieved. "I just thank God this is all over with," he said that November evening in 1995 when former Baltimore police Sgt. James A. Kulbicki was convicted of first-degree murder for the second time. "And that I'll never have to go through that again." He couldn't have been more wrong. The Nueslein family found themselves back in court last year as a new team of defense attorneys challenged just about every piece of evidence that tied Kulbicki to the killing of Gina Nueslein, 22, a convenience-store clerk with whom the married man had an affair and a child.
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