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NEWS

Accused Hopkins gynecologist suffocated himself with helium

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HEALTH

Mucous cysts are more annoying than dangerous

Courtesy of University of Maryland, Baltimore Sun
FEATURES
By Paige Williams and Paige Williams,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 1, 1998
This article is based on Montana and North Carolina court records, hearing transcripts, interviews, newspaper archives, and Charles Kuralt's books "A Life on the Road," "On the Road With Charles Kuralt" and "Charles Kuralt's America."On his sickbed in New York in the summer of 1997, Charles Kuralt thought of Montana, a place he had loved for a great many years for its natural wonders, far away from his life in the city.Down by a riverside, he built a log cabin. It reminded him of his native North Carolina, but most of all it gave him a place to disappear.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | August 30, 1993
A fine flap is brewing because some of our finest professional golfers don't want to visit the White House and meet President Clinton.They are members of the Ryder Cup team, which will represent this country against the best European players. Being on that team means they are the very best of our many great players.And it has become kind of a tradition for Ryder team members to go to the White House, shake hands with the president, pose for pictures, have some grub and maybe make a date for a round.
NEWS
July 6, 2013
Arthur Hirsch 's recent article about the Battle of Gettysburg reveals a disturbing ignorance of the political dynamics that brought this nation to a war that 150 years later remains the most cataclysmic event in our history ("A defining day relived," July 2). It accepts the shallow but unchallenged premise that the Civil War occurred because slavery was practiced in the South, and that righteous resolve to abolish the institution left the U.S. with no option other than a resort to arms.
FEATURES
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun reporter | June 18, 2008
When Shanae Watkins was 12, she killed a girl. Stabbed her three times with a kitchen knife one afternoon on a busy corner in downtown Baltimore. It was a dumb squabble over a 19-year-old guy. It's been more than a decade since Watkins cut short Chineye Mills' life at age 13, seven years since she left a juvenile detention center with a chance to start hers over again. Far from burying the murder in a corner of her psyche, Watkins, now 23, relives it all the time. Willingly. In public.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 9, 1992
Arthur Ashe, dying of AIDS, says he wished to live out his final years keeping his secret to himself. But he says questioning from a newspaper reporter forced him to announce his disease to the whole wide world.If a reporter forced his hand, then God save all of us in journalism from ourselves."I have AIDS," Ashe declared yesterday afternoon, trying in vain to keep his emotions in check. "I am sorry that I have been forced to make this revelation now, at this time. There is no good reason for this to happen now, but it has happened."
SPORTS
By Samantha Stevenson and Samantha Stevenson,New York Times News Service | November 4, 1990
MARINA DEL REY, Calif. -- Bo likes to cook cabbage and prizes his recipes for cornbread, biscuits and catfish. He plays a mean game of hide-and-seek, hates to give autographs when he is with his family, and loves toy stores."
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Putting too much stress on your joints? Or maybe arthritis has become an issue? Athletes, seniors or anyone in these categories could develop a bone spur, or extra bone produced by the body. There are some things to do at home if it causes short-term pain, and a doctor can offer suggestions if the pain doesn't stop, according to Dr. James Nace, an orthopedic surgeon with the LifeBridge Health Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics and a physical therapist. What is a bone spur, and why does it form?
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
The little girl in pigtails is sitting on her bed, talking about the day she killed her friend during a fight on a Baltimore street corner. "From what I remember, I stabbed her once," 14-year-old Shanae says matter-of-factly, her big brown eyes glancing up at the camera. "But from the autopsy reports, I stabbed her three times." This scene, from the opening of the documentary Girlhood, is how viewers first meet Shanae, the baby-faced Baltimore girl locked up for murder at age 12. A counselor has told Shanae that she seemed "quite happy" for a person who'd committed such a serious crime.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | April 28, 1993
A 53-year-old northeast Carroll county man was sentenced yesterday to eight years in state prison for sexually abusing three neighborhood children over four years.Carroll Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. sentenced the defendant to 15 years for child abuse and eight years each for two counts of battery. The man's name is being withheld to protect the children's privacy.His victims were two boys and a girl, court records show.Judge Beck suspended all but eight years of the sentence and ordered the defendant to serve five years of supervised probation after his release from prison.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | May 1, 2012
A 20-year-old man has pleaded guilty to first-degree murder and was sentenced to 30 years in prison for fatally shooting a U.S. Marine inside a hookah bar in downtown Baltimore as the sergeant prepared for redeployment to Afghanistan. The July 2, 2010 killing of 26-year-old Sgt. Chase Love inside the Queens Hookah Bar and Lounge on East Baltimore St., just east of Calvert Street, was one in a string of killings of active-duty servicemen in a six month period. Love, originally from New Orleans, had been visiting Baltimore with fellow Marine, Staff Sgt. Jamal Queen, who lives in Baltimore.
NEWS
August 28, 1998
Louise Shepard, wife of Mercury astronaut Alan Shepard, died of a heart attack Tuesday while flying home to Monterey, Calif., after visiting a daughter in Colorado. She was believed to have been 74. Alan Shepard, the first American to fly in space, died in his sleep last month at age 74 while being treated for leukemia.He and his wife shared a passion for golf -- Mr. Shepard was famous for hitting a golf ball on the moon -- and they were often photographed playing the game together when Mrs. Shepard accompanied her husband on business trips.
NEWS
By Robert S. McElvaine | August 31, 1997
IT IS GENERALLY accepted that the Civil War was the most important event in American history. Yet, as two recent controversies remind us, we disagree on what that war was about.The question of whether the nation should make a formal apology for slavery has brought forth from such authorities as former history professor Newt Gingrich and columnist George F. Will the declaration that we fought the war to end slavery.Meanwhile, across the South, where battles continue over the display of Confederate flags and related symbols, white defenders of their "heritage" argue that the Civil War was not about slavery but about states' rights and "Southern independence."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 14, 2003
Even if life is cheap in the City of God housing project outside Rio de Janeiro, it should exact more empathy than it does in City of God, a razzle-dazzle lower-depths melodrama. The movie's skill is stupefying in more ways than one. As the breakthrough feature from TV-commercial whiz Fernando Meirelles, it's an amazingly ambitious and assured urban spectacle, skipping through decades of gangland mayhem and related catastrophes without missing a narrative beat. As a statement on the debasement of everyday existence, starting with childhood and increasing with each generation, this movie drains you of feeling and puts nothing in its place.
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