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NEWS

Brooke Greenberg, 20, who suffered from rare genetic condition, dies

Photo courtesy of Howard Greenberg
EXPLORE

Fight against cancer is a fact of life for Manchester girl, 11, and her family

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NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
Sharon Fenick first heard the figure of speech "rule of thumb" cited as a sexist pejorative during her freshman year at Harvard seven years ago.The phrase was invoked in a lecture as an example of domestic abuse permitted by British common law. The rule of thumb, according to the professor, was a law that allowed a man to beat his wife so long as the rod used was no thicker than his thumb. But over the centuries, the term had evolved into vernacular for an "approximate measure.""It sounded very believable to me," says the 24-year-old Fenick, now in her third year of law school at the University of Chicago.
FEATURES
By Paige Williams and Paige Williams,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 1, 1998
This article is based on Montana and North Carolina court records, hearing transcripts, interviews, newspaper archives, and Charles Kuralt's books "A Life on the Road," "On the Road With Charles Kuralt" and "Charles Kuralt's America."On his sickbed in New York in the summer of 1997, Charles Kuralt thought of Montana, a place he had loved for a great many years for its natural wonders, far away from his life in the city.Down by a riverside, he built a log cabin. It reminded him of his native North Carolina, but most of all it gave him a place to disappear.
FEATURES
By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1995
The first time Bobby Ojeda saw Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital, it wasn't at all what he expected. The mix of old and new buildings on the wooded hillside looked imposing to him, like something out of a Hollywood movie. It could have been a fancy private school, or a small college.But they don't send you to private school when you're a major league baseball pitcher struggling to get over seeing two teammates killed in a boating accident. Mr. Ojeda came to Sheppard Pratt in July 1993 because he had survived, but still wasn't living.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | December 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President Bush signed the North American Free Trade Agreement yesterday, and his successor-in-waiting Bill Clinton immediately announced that he would not seek the treaty's renegotiation.Mr. Clinton, in a statement issued in Little Rock, Ark., said the signing represented "an important step" toward the economic integration of North America. He repeated his campaign assertion that there would have to be new job and environmental protections, and safeguards against sudden trade "surges," but these could be settled without renegotiating the treaty with Mexico and Canada before he submitted implementing legislation.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | December 2, 1994
I realize that we no longer live in an age of heroes.I realize that we must expect everyone, no matter how important they become, to let us down at one time or another.Nevertheless, today I feel a special sense of loss. I feel that my trust has been betrayed.Paula Jones has told a fib.Paula Jones is the person suing President Clinton for $700,000 because, she says, he dropped his pants and asked for sex in a Little Rock hotel room when he was governor of Arkansas.But ever since she made her accusations, Jones' own character has been under assault.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | April 28, 1993
A 53-year-old northeast Carroll county man was sentenced yesterday to eight years in state prison for sexually abusing three neighborhood children over four years.Carroll Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. sentenced the defendant to 15 years for child abuse and eight years each for two counts of battery. The man's name is being withheld to protect the children's privacy.His victims were two boys and a girl, court records show.Judge Beck suspended all but eight years of the sentence and ordered the defendant to serve five years of supervised probation after his release from prison.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1998
Ryan Minor took a few steps out of the Orioles' dugout last night, turned to look inside, then jogged slowly to third base. Perhaps he was checking to make sure no one was following him.Eleven days had passed since Minor's promotion from Double-A, and already he was treading on sacred ground. He hoped only to keep from falling.Without warning, Minor took the position that had belonged exclusively to Cal Ripken for the past two seasons, ending a consecutive-games streak that stretched to eternity.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | September 29, 2002
Why does the water heater in my new house have another small tank hanging off the side of the pipe above it? That is an expansion tank installed on the water supply pipe to the water heater. Its purpose is to deal with thermal expansion of water as it heats up in the water heater - to prevent water pressure from getting too high. If water pressure gets high enough it can damage valves in plumbing fixtures, joints in supply pipes and even the water heater. Thermal expansion always occurs in water heaters.
SPORTS
By Shia Kapos and Michael Hirsley and Shia Kapos and Michael Hirsley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2002
CHICAGO - St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Darryl Kile complained of shoulder pain and weakness the night before he died, possible warning signs that he had heart problems, officials said yesterday. An autopsy on Kile, 33, revealed an 80 to 90 percent narrowing of two of his three coronary arteries, and that his heart was nearly 25 percent larger than normal, said Dr. Edmund Donoghue, the Cook County, Ill., medical examiner. Donoghue said he believed Kile's condition, known as coronary atheroscleroris or hardening of the arteries, brought on an erratic heartbeat that caused his death.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 8, 2005
PUT YOURSELF in Mike Bolesta's place. On the morning of Feb. 20, he buys a new radio-CD player for his 17-year-old son Christopher's car. He pays the $114 installation charge with 57 crisp new $2 bills, which, when last observed, were still considered legitimate currency in the United States proper. The $2 bills are Bolesta's idea of payment, and his little comic protest, too. For this, Bolesta, Baltimore County resident, innocent citizen, owner of Capital City Student Tours, finds himself under arrest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun Staff | May 2, 2004
CBS News Sunday Morning anchor Charles Osgood, looking slightly more rumpled than usual, was hamming it up with Peabody Institute Director Robert Sirota. The two were sharing a seat at the grand piano in Peabody's Goodwin Recital Hall, banging out bars from "The Blue Danube" waltz. Sirota called Osgood a "natural stride pianist" and admired his "big left hand." "You can come back and play here anytime," Sirota offered. It was a nicer reception than he'd had the last time he'd been on this very stage --more than 60 years before -- at a piano recital.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,jill.rosen@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
We would have remembered him if it was just the songwriting or just the dancing or just the eyebrow-raising fashion. But Michael Jackson dominated each of those artistic avenues - and so many others. You see his influence in every Justin Timberlake who sweats to perfect a signature move. Every movie-esque flourish in a video. Every African-American artist who sits atop the pop charts. His legacy is as enduring as it is multi-faceted. 1. Sound When America first met Jackson, he was a lovable, pint-sized pre-teen with a puffy Afro and an electric voice.
NEWS
By Christine Stapleton and Christine Stapleton,Special to The Sun | August 21, 1994
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -- When attorneys for Jason Aaron DeLong try to convince a jury that the teen-ager was insane when he stabbed his mother and her friend to death last year, a key witness will be his father, Donald DeLong.The elder Mr. DeLong tried unsuccessfully last week to avoid going to Maryland for the first-degree murder trial, which is scheduled to begin Tuesday.He asked a Florida Circuit Court to excuse him from being subpoenaed on the grounds that he is not a material witness in the case and that his absence from his business in Jupiter for what promises to be a two-week trial would be a hardship.
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